TALES OF PANCHATANTRA

 

1) THE STORY OF THE MONKEY AND THE LOG.
2) THE STORY OF THE JACKAL AND THE DRUM.
3) THE STORY OF THE MERCHANT DANTILA.
4) THE STORY OF A HOLY MAN AND A SWINDLER.
5) THE STORY OF TWO FIGHTING RAMS AND A JACKAL.
6) THE STORY OF THE COBRA AND THE CROW.
7) THE STORY OF THE HERON AND THE CRAB.
8) THE STORY OF THE LION AND THE HAR.
9) THE STORY OF THE BUG AND THE FLEA.
1O) THE STORY OF THE JACKAL WHO FELL INTO VAT OF INDIGO DYE.
11) THE STORY OF THE LION, THE CAMEL, THE JACKAL AND THE CROW.
12) THE STORY OF THE TITTIBHA BIRDS AND THE SEA.
13) THE STORY OF THE TURTLE WHO FELL OFF THE STICK.
14) THE STORY OF THE THREE FISHES.
15) THE STORY OF THE ELEPHANT AND THE SPARROW.
16) THE STORY OF VAJRADAUNSTRA THE LION AND THE JACKAL.
17) THE STORY OF THE MONKEY AND A BIRD CALLED SUCHIMUKHA.
18) THE STORY OF THE SPARROW AND THE MONKEY.
19) THE STORY OF DHARMABUDDHI AND PAPABUDDH.
20) THE STORY OF THE FOOLISH HERON, THE BLACK SNAKE AND THE MUNGOOSE.
21) THE STORY OF THE IRON BALANCE AND THE MERCHANT'S SON.
22) THE STORY OF THE KING AND THE FOOLISH MONKEY.
23) THE STORY OF THE THIEF AND THE BRAHMINS.24) THE STORY OF SADHU AND THE MOUSE.
25) THE STORY OF MOTHER SHANDILI.
26) THE STORY OF THE ENMITY BETWEEN CROWS AND OWLS.
27) THE STORY OF THE HARES AND THE ELEPHANTS.
28) THE STORY OF THE HARE AND THE PARTRIDGE.
29) THE STORY OF THE BRAHMINS AND THE THREE CROOKS.
30) THE STORY OF THE BRAHMIN AND THE COBRA.
31) THE STORY OF THE OLD MERCHANT, HIS YOUNG WIFE AND THE THIEF.
32) THE STORY OF THE BRAHMIN, THE THIEF AND THE RAKSHASA.
33) THE STORY OF THE SNAKE IN THE ANTHILL AND THE SNAKE IN THE BELLY OF THE PRINCE.
34) THE STORY OF THE FEMALE MOUSE.
35) THE STORY OF THE HUNTER AND THE BIRD WHOSE DROPPING TURNED INTO GOLD.
36) THE STORY OF THE LION, THE JACKAL AND THE CAVE.
37) THE STORY OF THE FROG AND THE BLACK SNAKE.
38) THE STORY OF THE KING OF FROGS AND THE SNAKE.
39) THE STORY OF THE LION AND THE DONKEY.
40) THE STORY OF THE POTTER CALLED YUDHISTHIRA.
41) THE STORY OF THE LIONESS AND THE YOUNG JACKAL.
42) THE STORY OF THE DONKEY AND THE WASHERMAN.
43) THE STORY OF THE CAMEL WITH A BELL ROUND HIS NECK.
44) THE STORY OF THE JACKAL, THE LION, THE LEOPARD AND THE TIGER.
45) THE STORY OF THE DOG IN A FOREIGN COUNTRY.
46) THE STORY OF THE BRAHMIN'S WIFE AND THE MONGOOSE.
47) THE STORY OF CHAKRADHARA.
48) THE STORY OF THE BRAHMINS WHO PUT LIFE INTO THE LION.
49) THE STORY OF THE FOUR LEARNED FOOLS.
50) THE STORY OF TWO FISHES AND THE FROG.
51) THE STORY OF THE SINGING DONKEY.
52) THE STORY OF KING CHANDRA.

STORIES FOR PARENTS

A) THE STORY OF THE MERCHANT'S SON.
B) THE STORY OF THE DOVE AND THE HUNTER.
C) THE STORY OF SOMILAKA.




TALES OF PANCHATANTRA



1. THE STORY OF THE MONKEY AND THE LOG

A merchant had started building a temple beneath the trees on the outskirts of a town.

Every day the carpenters and the workmen used to go into the town for their midday meals.

Now, one particular day, a troop of wandering monkeys arrived on the scene.

One of the carpenters who was in the middle of sawing a log, put a wedge in it, to prevent the log from closing up, and then went off.

The monkeys started playing on the tops of the trees and the high structures, without a care in the world.

One poor monkey, not destined to live long, sat down on the half split log, put his legs in the gap, caught hold of the wedge with his hands and started pulling it out.

And behold! The wedge came out all of a sudden and the log closed in. The monkey's legs which were in the gap of the log got trapped.

He was instantly killed.

The wise indeed say: One, who interferes in other's work, surely comes to grief.





2) THE STORY OF THE JACKAL AND THE DRUM

There was once a jackal named Gomaya who was staying in a jungle.

One day, he was very hungry and he wandered about in search of food.

At last he came to a battle field.

There the fighting armies had left behind a drum, lying near some creepers.

Because of a strong wind, the creepers were rubbing against the drum and making noise.

When the jackal heard this, he got frightened and thought to himself, 'Unless I can make myself scarce before whoever is making this noise sees me, I am done for.

But then, it is unwise to desert one's home suddenly, so instead I must be brave and try to find out who is making this noise'.

So he took all his courage in his hands and as he crept forward, he realized that it was only a drum which made the noise.

He continued his search and nearby he found sufficient food to last him a long time.

The wise indeed say: Only the brave succeed in life.





3) THE STORY OF THE MERCHANT DANTILA

Somewhere in the world, is a city called Vardhamana.

A very efficient and prosperous merchant, lived there.

Knowing his ability, the king appointed him as an administrator of the capital.

During his administration, he kept the common people as well the king very happy.

One rarely comes across such a person who keeps everyone happy.

In the course of time, the marriage of merchant's daughter took place.

The merchant invited the king and the queen along with the entire court to his house.

He entertained them lavishly, gave them presents of clothing etc. and in this way, he showed them great respect.

A servant who used to sweep the floors of the king's palace, came there too, but uninvited.

He sat down on a seat meant for some one else.

The merchant caught him by his neck and threw him out.

The servant felt insulted and could not sleep all night for thinking, 'How can I get the merchant into disfavour with the king and so get even with him? But then, what chance have I, an ordinary fellow, of harming such a powerful person as he is'.

And so he hit upon a plan.

Several days later, early in the morning, when the king was not yet wide awake, the servant was sweeping the floor near his bed and said. 'Good heavens! The merchant has become so brazen nowadays that he actually dares to embrace the queen!'

When the king heard this, he jumped up and shouted, 'Oh you ! Is that true? Has the merchant really embraced my queen?'

'Master,' replied the servant 'I was gambling all night and didn't sleep at all. This morning I feel drowsy... I really don't know what I've been saying. But if I have said anything out of place, please forgive me.'

Jealous, the king thought to himself, 'Yes! The servant is allowed to go about freely in the palace and so is the merchant.

It is quite possible that the servant has seen the merchant embracing my queen.'

The king's thoughts were so troubled that, from that day onward, he withdrew his favours from the merchant and, what is more, he forbade him even to enter the palace.

The merchant was astounded to see this sudden change in the king's attitude.

Some time passed. One day, when the merchant wanted to pass through the gateway to the palace, he was stopped by the guards.

The servant, who was sweeping the floor, saw this and he said with a smirk, 'Ho! Guards! That fellow is the king's favourite. He can arrest or release people, just as he pleases. He threw me out. Be careful, you may suffer the same fate.'

When the merchant heard this, he thought to himself, 'It is surely the servant who has caused all this trouble. Now I understand everything.'

The merchant felt upset and returned home in a very dejected mood.

He thought it over and that evening, he invited the servant to his house, flattered him, gave him a pair of garments and said kindly, 'My dear friend, it was not because I was angry that I threw you out that day but because it was an impropriety for you to take the seat you took.

It was reserved for a Brahmin. The Brahmin felt insulted, that's why I had to throw you out. Forgive me.'When the servant saw the clothes, he was very pleased.

Full of joy, he said to the merchant, 'Sir, now I forgive you. You have expressed your regrets and also honoured me.

Once again you shall see the favour of the king and in this way I shall prove to you my cleverness.'

With these words the servant went home happily.

Next morning, he went to the palace and started sweeping the floor.

When he had made sure that the king was lying half-awake, he said, 'The king is really indiscreet, he eats cucumber in the lavatory!'

The king was taken aback to hear this and he shouted, 'You! What's that nonsense you're talking! It's only because you're my servant that I don't kill you. Have you ever seen me doing such a thing?'

'Master', said the servant, 'I was gambling last night and didn't sleep at all. This morning I feel drowsy. I really don't know what I've been saying. But if I've said anything out of place, please forgive me.'

When the king heard this, he thought to himself, 'Never I my life have I eaten cucumber in the lavatory.

If this fool has said something ridiculous about me, surely what he said about the merchant was ridiculous too. It was wrong of me to have insulted the merchant.

Besides, without him, the whole administrative system, at the palace and in the city, has become slack.'

When he had considered this carefully, the king invited the merchant to the palace, presented him with jewels and clothing and re-appointed him to his former position.

The wise indeed say: One should treat one and all, even the lowest with respect.





4) THE STORY OF A HOLY MAN AND A SWINDLER

Once upon a time, in a lonely temple there lived a holy man called Dev Sharma.

Many people used to visit him and present him with money and finely woven garments, which he sold and got very rich on the proceeds.

And by nature, he trusted nobody.

Night and day he kept the treasure purse under his armpit and would not part with it even for a second.

A swindler, who robbed other men of their money, noticed that the holy man always kept the treasure purse under his armpit.

He said to himself, 'How could I rob this holy man of his money! It's difficult to make a hole through the walls of the temple or to get in over the high gates, so what I'll do is, charm him with honeyed words so that he accepts me as his disciple.

And when he has put confidence in me, some day he'll fall into my clutches.'

When he had resolutely made up his mind, to carry out this plan, the swindler i approached the holy man, stood before him with reverence and said, 'Om Namaha Shivaya!'( I bow before Lord Shiva, the God of death)

With these words he threw himself humbly on the ground before the holy man and said, 'Oh Guruji! I am fed up of this life. Please do guide me so that I follow the right path in this life and find happiness .'

When the holy man heard this, he said kindly, 'My son, you are indeed blessed that you have come to me at this young age, surely I will guide you.'

When the swindler heard this, he fell on the ground before the holy man, touched his feet, and said, 'Oh, Guruji, please do accept me as your disciple.'

'My child! answered the holy man 'I will, but on one condition, that you will never enter the temple at night, because a holy man is recommended to stay alone at night without company and meditate . We will keep to it, you and I.'

'And so', continued the holy man, 'after taking the vow of initiation, you will have to sleep in a thatched hut at the gate of the temple.'

'I shall willingly carry out your wishes', said thr swindler

At bedtime, the holy man initiated the swindler according to the rituals and made him his disciple.

The swindler massaged his hands and feet, waited upon him and made him happy but nonetheless the holy man did not part with his money bag even for a second.

After some time, the swindler began to think, 'He does not trust me at all! Shall I knife him in broad daylight, poison him or kill him like a wild animal?'

While he was thinking this over, the son of one of the holy man's disciples, from a nearby village, came to give him a personal invitation and said, 'Guruji,! Today the ceremony of the sacred thread takes place in our house.

Please come and sanctify it with your presence.'

The holy man accepted the invitation willingly and started off accompanied by the swindler

On the way, they came to a river.

When the holy man saw the river, he folded his money bag in his robe and said, ' Oh my child! Look after this robe with the vigilance of a Yogi until I return.'

And he went into the bushes.

The minute the holy man's back was turned, the swindler vanished with the money bag.

After the holy man had answered the call of nature, he slowly returned, thinking about his money.

When he got back, he failed to find the swindler but saw only his robe, lying on the ground.

He peered anxiously inside but could not find his purse.

He began to cry out, 'Alas! I have been robbed'.

And he fell on the ground in a swoon.

After sometime he returned to his senses.

He got up and began to shout ' Oh! Where are you, you rascal! Answer me!'

After he had shouted like this in a loud voice, he slowly trailed the swindler's footsteps until, just before evening, he came to a village.

He stayed there for the night and in the morning, returned to his temple.

This wise indeed say :Do not be taken in by the sweet words of a swindler.'






 
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